Giraffe in Amboseli

During one of the morning game drives in Amboseli National Park in Kenya, I came across this unusual sight of two giraffes playing with each other. The background of the huge Acacia tree caught my attention which is very typical of Amboseli savannah.

Black bellied bustard

The word bustard (from the French word bistard) has its origin in the Latin words avis tarda meaning “slow bird”.These birds have distinctive long legs and necks which enable them to see over tall grass.
Taken at Amboseli National park, Kenya

Mother & young ones

 

A group of ostriches is a pride or a flock, and they live in small herds that typically contain less than a dozen birds. The flightless ostrich is the world’s largest bird and it is mainly found in the African savannah as well as in other selected desert lands.A young ostrich is called a chick.This is the first time I saw a flock with young ones.

Gazelle stot

Thomson’s gazelles are found mainly in Tanzania and Kenya, and there’s a small population in southern Sudan. They form herds of up to 200 individuals, but form much looser groups while migrating. Like other gazelles they perform ‘stotting’ or ‘pronking’ when alarmed by a predator. This involves jumping repeatedly with legs stiff and back curved and landing on all fours. Stotting is thought to demonstrate to the predator the amount of energy the gazelle has and thus to forestall a long chase by telling it ‘I’m too athletic for you to catch’.

Curiosity

Cheetah prowling..The curious expression in his face shows that he is upto something mischievous!!! He was about to mock chase a herd of wildebeests. — at Amboseli National park,Kenya

Stop pulling my tail..

Elephants playing with each other at Amboseli national Park. Whats your caption for this picture??

Elephant dusting

This was taken near the swamp in Amboseli National park, Kenya.Elephants fling dust to keep themselves cool and free of pests. Though they are rough to touch, their skin is very sensitive.Mud is actually very affective at blocking UV radiation and heat, which elephants find much less comfortable than dirt.